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Ethics, Literature, and Theory

An Introductory Reader
Sofort lieferbar | Lieferzeit: Sofort lieferbar I
ISBN-13:
9781461674870
Veröffentl:
2005
Seiten:
424
Autor:
Stephen K. George
eBook Typ:
Adobe Digital Editions
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, and Wayne Booth; philosophers Martha Nussbaum, Richard Hart, and Nina Rosenstand; and authors John Updike, Charles Johnson, Flannery O'Connor, and Bernard Malamud. Divided into four sections, with introductory matter and questions for discussion, this accessible anthology represents the most crucial work today exploring the interdisciplinary connections between literature, religion and philosophy.
Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader brings together the work of contemporary scholars, teachers, and writers into lively discussion on the moral role of literature and the relationship between aesthetics, art, and ethics.


Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? What do we mean when we talk about ethical criticism and how does this differ from the common notion of censorship?



Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions including: literary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, and Wayne Booth; philosophers Martha Nussbaum, Richard Hart, and Nina Rosenstand; and authors John Updike, Charles Johnson, Flannery O'Connor, and Bernard Malamud. Divided into four sections, with introductory matter and questions for discussion, this accessible anthology represents the most crucial work today exploring the interdisciplinary connections among literature, religion and philosophy.
Part 1 Foreword

Part 2 Preface

Part 3 Ethical Criticism and Literary Theory

Chapter 4 Premises on Art and Morality

Chapter 5 The Moral Connections of Literary Texts

Chapter 6 Why Ethical Criticism Can Never Be Simple

Chapter 7 Ethical Criticism: What It Is and Why It Matters

Chapter 8 Against Ethical Criticism

Chapter 9 Who Is Responsible in Ethical Criticism?

Chapter 10 The Absence of the Ethical: Literary Theory and Ethical Theory

Chapter 11 Evaluative Discourse: A New Turn Towards the Ethical

Chapter 12 The Moral and the Aesthetical: Literary Study and the Social Order

Part 13 Philosophy Religion, and Literature

Chapter 14 Reading for Life

Chapter 15 The "Ancient Quarrel": Literature and Moral Philosophy

Chapter 16 Stories and Morals

Chapter 17 The Absence of Stories: Filling the Void in Ethics

Chapter 18 Literature and the Catholic Perspective

Chapter 19 Literature and Protestantism

Chapter 20 Something to Measure By: Quaker Values in Literature

Chapter 21 Literary Criticism and Religious Values

Part 22 Writers' Responsibilities

Chapter 23 A Writer's Duty

Chapter 24 The Writer's Moral Sense

Chapter 25 Imaginative Writing and the Jewish Experience

Chapter 26 The Problem of Evil in Fiction

Chapter 27 Poetry, Politics, and Morality

Chapter 28 Art and Ethics?

Chapter 29 What Violence in Literature Must Teach Us

Chapter 30 Ethics and Literature

Part 31 Readers and Ethical Criticism

Chapter 32 The Case Against Huck Finn

Chapter 33 Why We Still Need Huckleberry Finn

Chapter 34 Huckleberry Finn: An Amazing Troubling Book

Chapter 35 The Ethical Dimensions of Richard Wright's
Native Son

Chapter 36 Sethe's Choice:
Beloved and the Ethics of Reading

Chapter 37 Steinbeck, Johnson, and the Master/Slave Relationship

Chapter 38 Censorship and the Classroom

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